Shows Channels New Hampshire Public Television THE WRITE-N-ATOR!
The Word-N-ator!
wordgirl
  • Your Mission
  • For Teachers

Captain Huggy Face is Glum

In this clip we learn that glum means to feel sad. After Captain Huggy Face learns that glum means sad, he becomes very happy, the opposite of glum. Words that have the opposite meaning are called antonyms (ant-o-nims).

Captain Huggy Face is Glum

Educational Standards
  • R:LT:4:1.5: Identifying literary devices as appropriate to genre: rhyme, alliteration, simile, description, or dialogue
  • R:LT:5:1.5: Identifying literary devices as appropriate to genre: rhyme, alliteration, simile, dialogue, imagery, or simple metaphors
  • R:V:1-3:2.1: Identifying synonyms and antonyms to connect new words to known words
  • R:V:4-5:2.1: Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones, or shades of meaning
  • W:EW:3:2.1: Using details
  • W:EW:3:2.3: Creating character(s) through description of physical attributes
  • W:EW:4:2.1: Using relevant and descriptive details
  • W:EW:4:2.3a: Identifying characters
  • W:EW:4:2.3b: Creating character(s) through description of physical attributes and behaviors
  • W:EW:5:2.3: Developing characters through description
TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
 
wordgirl
  • Your Mission
  • For Teachers

Car Wash Face Off

In this segment Scoops' family prepares to challenge Becky's family in a car wash face off. The only problem is Becky, their best car washer, is missing. This leaves the Botsfords with low morale, or little excitement. While your watching pay attention to how morale, or the level of excitement, changes.

Car Wash Face Off

Educational Standards
  • W:EW:1-4:2.5: Writing about observations and experiences
  • W:EW:1-5:2.6: Extending and elaborating ideas with purpose
  • W:HW:3-5:2.2: Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions
  • W:RC:1:2.1: Using prior knowledge or references to text to respond to a question
  • W:RC:3-5:1.3: Connecting what has been read (plot/ideas/concepts) to prior knowledge, which might include other texts
TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
 
wordgirl
  • Your Mission
  • For Teachers

What's Up Doc

In this clip, WordGirl is looking for help from Dr. Boxleitner. The Butcher has gotten away from WordGirl twice and she doesn't know how to stop him. She thinks Dr. Boxleitner can help her. Dr. Boxleitner tests WordGirl's strength, speed, and colossal vocabulary power. They all seem fine! While she is in the lab, WordGirl notices that that Dr. Boxleitner has a vicious lab mouse. At the end of the clip, Dr. Boxleitner turns to Squeaky, the lab mouse, rubs his hands together and says "Soon Squeeky, soon." What can he mean? Does he have an evil plot in mind? Can you make any predictions based on what you saw?

What's Up Doc

Predicting what might happen in a story is a great way for children to develop better comprehension skills. It helps them think about what they have read, or in this case, what they have heard and seen. Encourge them to develop their predictions based on what they already know about the characters, the storyline, and the clues they were given in the clip.

Educational Standards
  • R:LT:2:2.1: Making logical predictions EXAMPLE: What might happen next?
  • R:LT:3:2.1: Making logical predictions
  • R:LT:4:2.1: Making logical predictions
  • R:LT:5:2.1: Making logical predictions EXAMPLE: “Which event is most likely to happen next?”
  • W:EW:1-4:2.5: Writing about observations and experiences
  • W:EW:3:2.1: Using details
  • W:EW:4:2.1: Using relevant and descriptive details
  • W:EW:5:2.1: Using relevant and descriptive details and sensory language to advance the plot/story line
TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
 
wordgirl
  • Your Mission
  • For Teachers

Does the Mecha Mouse Machine Have a Flaw?

In this clip, we learn that WordGirl is astonished by the powers of Dr. Two Brains' Mechanized Muscle Mouse Machine. What’s really astonishing is that all of the words in Mechanized Muscle Mouse Machine begin with the same letter – M! That’s an example of alliteration.

Does the Mecha Mouse Machine Have a Flaw?

Educational Standards
  • R:LT:3:1.5: Identifying literary devices as appropriate to genre: rhyme, alliteration, dialogue, or description
  • R:LT:4:1.5: Identifying literary devices as appropriate to genre: rhyme, alliteration, simile, description, or dialogue
  • W:EW:3:2.1: Using details
  • W:EW:4:2.1: Using relevant and descriptive details
TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
 
wordgirl
  • Your Mission
  • For Teachers

Lady Redundant Woman Dreams Big

In this segment Lady Redundant Woman explains her super powers. More importantly, she reveals her plans to overthrow her boss, Dave so she can become "Copy Shop Manager" - for life.

Lady Redundant Woman Dreams Big

Educational Standards
  • R:LT:2:2.1: Making logical predictions EXAMPLE: What might happen next?
  • R:LT:3:2.1: Making logical predictions
  • R:LT:4:2.1: Making logical predictions
  • R:LT:5:2.1: Making logical predictions EXAMPLE: “Which event is most likely to happen next?”
  • R:V:1-3:2.1: Identifying synonyms and antonyms to connect new words to known words
  • W:EW:1-5:2.6: Extending and elaborating ideas with purpose
  • W:EW:3:2.1: Using details
  • W:HW:3-5:2.2: Sharing thoughts, observations, or impressions
  • W:IW:1-5:1.1: Sorting and classifying facts
TAKE THE CHALLENGE!
 
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